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Should Massage Hurt?

Ask 10 therapists this question and you are likely to get 10 very different answers. Some therapists do not believe that massage should be painful, ever, and if you are in any sort of discomfort then you are being massaged too hard. Other are at the opposite end of the spectrum and if you are not squirming, squealing and wriggling as they beat the knots out of you then they are not going hard enough.

My answer….it depends.

If you are purely after relaxation massage at a day spa or for stress relief then you would be looking for a massage that is be blissful and pain free. If you have never had a massage before then this is probably the end of the pain spectrum that you can reasonably expect to receive.

You should not feel sore or uncomfortable that day (or the next morning) and any pain is an indication that the therapist wasn’t listening to you or your body.

However, I’m sure I gave one of those massage in 2004.

Deep Tissue massage of a woman's thighPeople who book in to see me are generally after remedial, deep tissue or sports massage and for this group of massage recipients then some degree of discomfort both during and after the massage should be anticipated. Sometimes you have to take one step back to move two forwards.

If you are suffering from a sore back or a stiff neck then myofascial restrictions and adhesive scar tissues need to be worked. Polishing the skin just isn’t going to cut the mustard even if it does calm the nervous system and relax the sympathetic nervous system. You need to get into the muscles (and other soft tissues such as ligaments and fascia) and disrupt their current condition in order to obtain the response that you are looking for.

Now although a deep tissue massage sounds as though it should be excessively painful, this is not necessarily the case. Deep tissue merely means working the deeper levels of tissue, working through superficial layers of fascia and muscle to achieve a change in the structure of the deeper tissues.

But while it needn’t be excessively painful, in reality it is almost always the case that it can be uncomfortable. Personally I do take issue with therapists who say that deep tissue massage should never hurt and feel that either they have never experienced genuine deep tissue massage or they are doing it wrong.

By the same token, though there are therapists who work at such a pressure and intensity that a client is literally bruised and in more discomfort than when they started the massage. “No pain – no gain” may the mantra of the therapist. This doesn’t sit comfortably with me but if it works for them and their clients then so be it. So long as they are genuine with their intentions, explain how they will work and warn their clients how they will feel after the massage then that’s ok with me.

It’s just not the way I work.

  
I like to work within the clients pain threshold so that whilst it may be uncomfortable and bordering on painful (when I consider it to be appropriate), it should never be so heavy that they are wincing and flinching on the table. By the way, the level of pain threshold does tend to increase the more massage you receive and arguments have been made that this isn’t necessarily a good thing (eg needing more and more pressure to achieve the same response is almost an addiction).

Ultimately it is up to you to find a massage style and therapist that suits you. If you have never had a massage before and you are in pain during the massage, then speak up. Similarly if you know what you want and the therapist is one of those who insists on not hurting you at all then maybe you need to find someone else who can give you the type of bodywork you are after.

By Richard Lane

The Benefits of Abdominal Massage

Many massage therapists will spend the vast majority of session working on the back of the client. They will give great bodywork to the back, shoulders, neck and the back of the legs but then only give cursory attention to the front of the body. Now it is true that most of us have significant issues with the back of our bodies but to neglect the muscles and soft tissues at the front of the body is to provide an incomplete session. Only a few therapists would routinely incorporate an abdominal massage within a full body massage, yet there is little doubt that bodywork through the stomach area can offer many health benefits.

Abdominal massageMost people who do request an abdominal massage would likely do so because of digestive issues although there is also significant musculature in the area that may require release to assist with physical problems. For example, a tight and contracted rectus abdominis muscle will impact on the stability and movement of the lower part of the body or lead to us slouching forward setting up postural imperfection through the lower back.

In total there are at least four layers of muscles in the abdomen and these can impact on your core strength (both your physical and emotional core). Trigger points are not uncommon in the abdominal muscles and the pain referral patterns can include the lower back. Simons and Travell (1) observed that

An active trigger point high in the rectus abdominis muscle on either side can refer to the mid-back bilaterally, which is described by the patient as running horizontally across the back on both sides at the thoracolumbar level … In the lowest part of the rectus abdominis, trigger points may refer pain bilaterally to the sacroiliac and low back regions.

Regardless of the requirement for remedial massage and trigger point techniques for hypertonic muscles in the abdomen, the vast majority of abdominal massage will be for digestive issues. Most therapists consider that massage to the stomach areas will improve the capability of the digestive system and will potentially benefit some of the organs that are contained within the abdominal cavity (such as liver, pancreas, gall bladder, small intestine and colon). A recent review of research has confirmed that there are likely to be benefits for performing abdominal massage to treat chronic constipation. Sinclair (2) concluded “studies have demonstrated that abdominal massage can stimulate peristalsis, decrease colonic transit time, increase the frequency of bowel movements in constipated patients, and decrease the feelings of discomfort and pain that accompany it. There is also good evidence that massage can stimulate peristalsis in patients with post-surgical ileus.”

Routine for Abdominal Massage
In order to give an abdominal massage then the stomach needs to be exposed and it is usually recommended that there be some bolstering under the knees to slightly relax the abdominal region. Normal massage lubricatants are fine to use.

– Place your hands gently on the stomach and palpate. The stomach should feel soft and relaxed

– Always be aware of the breathing of the client and work with the breathe, not against it.

– Sink in through the diaphragm region with the breathe of the client

– Lightly work along the lower border of the rib-cage with fingers and thumbs.

– Gently effleurage the area with light circular strokes. Always work in the direction of the digestive system which means working clockwise around the stomach.

– Place your hands over the rectus abdominis and gently palpate for areas of tenderness and restriction. Work the edges of the muscles with static compression (asking the client to tense the muscle by have them start to sit up) with sufficient pressure to be therapeutic but not too much that it causes pain. Release attachments at the xyphoid process (obviously without ever putting direct pressure on the vulnerable process itself). Release the attachments at the upper border of the pubic bone (mindful of the sensitive nature of this area – if client has any concerns then you can get them to use their own hand to achieve this release or alternatively work through a drape).

– Work deeper under the ribcage on both sides of the body (be aware of working too deeply directly into the liver which is on the right side of the body). Cross friction at any tender points.

– Pull through the sides of the body with relaxed hands, reaching around the body as far as possible, working and stretching the fascia.

– Work the ascending colon (right side) and descending colon (left). Make sure you connect with sufficient pressure through colon although not too much so that it causes pain. Some therapists recommended clearing the descending colon first too “make room”.

– Finish with a calming connective touch to the abdomen.

  
Normal massage contraindications would apply for abdominal bodywork and if the massage is to be performed for a specific health objective then it is recommended that it be discussed with suitable doctor prior to treatment. Also be aware that many people may have emotional sensitivity and instinctively be highly protective of this so any bodywork needs to be mindful and respectful

1. Simons DG, Travell JG. Myofascial Pain and Dysfunction: The Trigger Point Manual, Volume 1, Upper Half of Body, 2nd Edition. Lippincott, Williams and Wilkins, 1999:943.
2. Sinclair M. The use of abdominal massage to treat chronic constipation. J Bodyw Mov Ther 2011; 15:436-445.

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Update – a 2011 review of the effect of abdominal massage in chronic constipation found that abdominal massage can stimulate peristalsis, decrease colonic transit time, increase the frequency of bowel movements in constipated patients, and decrease the feelings of discomfort and pain that accompany it.

“The use of abdominal massage to treat chronic constipation.” Sinclair M.
J Bodyw Mov Ther. 2011 Oct;15(4):436-45. doi: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2010.07.007. Epub 2010 Aug 25.
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By Richard Lane

Massage and Back Pain
– Research Findings

There are many reasons why people book in for a mobile massage in Sydney with us. It can be purely to de-stress and wind down. It can be as a reward for working hard. It can be part of a sportsman training regime to include a regular sports massage. However, the majority of people that we see are suffering from physical discomfort and they are looking for remedial therapy to help them reduce the pain and tightness they are experiencing.

Massage for back pain reliefNeck /shoulder pain and headaches are probably the top of the list for the reason why people book in for a remedial massage and many people know that massage is a great way to deal with these problems. The next most popular reason for getting a remedial or deep tissue massage is for lower back pain and there is some good news that recent research has found that massage may very help is dealing with the pain and suffering that lower back pain can cause.

When suffering from lower back pain many people seek out medications from their doctor to treat the pain. Others try exercise regimes from physiotherapist. However, a significant proportion of experiencing and secondly as a form of preventative maintenance once they are relatively pain-free. Researchers set out to ascertain whether massage compared favourably against usual medical intervention for treating lower back pain.

In the study (1), carried out by researchers from the Group Health Research Institute, Seattle, Washington, the study participants were randomly assigned to receive either a relaxation massage, a structural (remedial/deep tissue) massage or usual medical care without massage. Their symptoms had been assessed and also recorded was the impact of the back pain on their daily life.

Those in the massage groups had a one hour session weekly for 10 weeks.

The symptoms of those in the study were recorded after completing the massage program, at six months and finally a year after they initially began the massage.

The results obtained were encouraging for the massage industry. After the 10 week assessment, the researchers found that those who had received massage had lower levels of pain and they were able to perform daily tasks better than those who had only received the usual medical care. These results were similar regardless of which type of massage they received, be it relaxation or structural.

Whilst the benefits did not remain after one year, there was still a significant difference with the results obtained after 6 months and so it may be reasonable to conclude that massage can be an effective treatment for those who are suffering from lower back pain.

(1) Cherkin DC, Sherman KJ, Kahn J, Wellman R, Cook AJ, Johnson E, Erro J, Delaney K, Deyo RA. “A comparison of the effects of 2 types of massage and usual care on chronic low back pain: a randomized, controlled trial.” Ann Intern Med. 2011 Jul 5;155(1):1-9.

By Richard Lane

3 hour massage offer

Please Note: This offer is no longer available – if you are interested in receiving a 3 hour massage then please call and we can discuss price/time etc.

Recently there was an online discussion about the merits or otherwise of giving and receiving a three hour massage. This as a result of someone getting rave reviews for three + hour massages that he was providing to his clients.

Whilst I have provided lengthy massages when I was based in a clinic, I have never given a 3 hour massage as a mobile massage and would be interested in trying to some to see
(a) if there is a demand for such experiences and
(b) whether I’m physically up to it!

So as a marketing exercise I would like to offer a couple of 3 hour massages for the price of 90 minutes hour (ie $130 which would also be covered under health funds if you could claim for remedial massage).

(now for the small print)
This offer is:
– made by Richard Lane and the 3 hour massage offer is not available for any other therapist who work with Inner West Mobile Massage.
– 3 hour massages are only available Monday to Friday during business hours. This offer is not available for evening/weekend appointments.
– suitable for someone who has deep tissue/remedial or sports massage on a (semi) regular basis. If you have not had a massage in a while then it is possible that a 3 hour session may be a little too strenous for the body. Also please be conscious of any massage contraindications that may impact on the suitability of receiving an extended massage (eg pregnancy, specific injuries or conditions, etc)
– initially available for one male and one female client who respond according to the instructions below (will add in the comment as and when booking is made with a male or female client).
– available for locations within the map below.


View 3 hour massage offer region in a larger map

If you wish to book a 3 hour massage or would like any more information then either send an email to richard@innerwestmassage.com.au with your location, contact details and times that may be suitable. As this is an offer with Richard Lane directly then we ask that you do not phone the Inner West Mobile Massage number directly.

Please Note: This offer is no longer available – if you are interested in receiving a 3 hour massage then please call and we can discuss price/time etc.

By Richard Lane

Massage in Newtown

If you walk down King Street in Newtown you will see that there are quite a few places where you can get a massage. This may be from a Chinese massage clinic, a Thai day spa or a remedial massage clinic. Some of these will accept walk-in appointments, some of these will require you to book.

If you are looking for a massage from an accredited and professionally trained therapist then it is probably best to avoid most of the establishments that will take walk-in appointments as some of the therapist’s massage experience might be a little limited.

One of the problems with getting a massage in the area is that parking on King St can be a challenge at the best of times. If you have booked an appointment at a certified clinic then you may find that you have to allow yourself a fair amount of time to get there and park so that you are not rushing to get to your appointment on time.

There is an alternative though which can overcome some of the problems of getting a massage in Newtown. Inner West Mobile Massage provides a service in which professionally trained therapists come to you.

No more worries about parking for you.
No more worries about whether you are getting a massage from an accredited therapist.

All of our therapists are recognised by professional associations in Australia (such as ATMS) and are registered with health funds to provide rebates for remedial massage. The services we offer include remedial, sports, deep tissue and pregnancy massage and we bring all the equipment we need, massage table, towels and oils.

Therapists are available 7 days a week, including evenings. Obviously the more notice you can provide the better but some therapists may be available at short notice (online bookings are available for some therapists through Online massage booking).

Please note that we only provide therapeutic massage services and whilst there are both female and male therapists available for mobile massage, we will only accept bookings with female therapists from females.

If you want any more information then please give us a call on 0421 410057.

Remedial Massage in Newtown, NSW

By Richard Lane

Deep Tissue Massage Sydney

If you check out any website of a massage clinic or service that offers therapeutic massage then the chances are that they have listed “Deep Tissue Massage” as one of the services that they offer. It may be listed separately or in conjunction with other massage modalities such as sport or remedial massage.

It is not unusual that the price for a Sydney deep tissue massage is quoted higher than for a relaxation or Swedish massage (or even remedial massage).

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deep tissue massageThe use of the term deep tissue massage causes much discussion in the massage fraternity and there are therapists who believe that deep tissue massage = deep pressure massage and this is simply not the case. Whilst most therapists would concur that it refers to the massaging of the deep layers of the muscles, the massage strokes and techniques used in a deep tissue massage will vary depending on the training and preferences of the therapist.

This is purely my opinion but those who have received specific recognised training in deep tissue massage will work slowly and with intent. They will use a wide range of massage tools to work through the superficial layers of the body to reach the deeper muscles and soft tissues. Although the massage can be a little intense at time they are not necessarily using a great deal pressure as by working slowly then it is

Those who have not received specific training may not have the same level of understanding and believe that deep tissue massage means using a lot of pressure. Indeed many clients believe that a deep tissue massage is by definition a strong massage. As such these therapists often use more body force and energy to achieve their goals and this may be the reason why they charge a greater price for their services if they believe that they cannot do as many deep tissue massages in a day compared with relaxation.

Recently this issue was discussed on Facebook and below are some of the quotes from therapists regarding the a discussion about charging differential prices for deep tissue massage. There are certainly some differences of opinion!

We don’t, but I have considered it. When you are massaging a Lions football player, it’s hard work no matter how good your mechanics are!
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I certainly come out sweating a lot more doing deep tissue than just a traditional relaxation swedish massage… especially if I am working on an athlete!
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I’m going to go ahead an entertain this subject. Each individual has a RIGHT/PREFERENCE to charge however & whatever rate they choose. It baffles me that MTs want a justification for what others do in their own private practice or Spa. But to tickle your fancy…..rather seeing as charging a client a higher rate for Deep Tissue, I see it as offering a discount to a modality that is less cumbersome. Some may see it as charging a higher rate as being ‘unfair’. Well, my deep tissue is $80 per hour. Sure I can charge one flat rate. But I would much rather charge $60 for Swedish given the fact that is IS less taxing for me and my team. So you see, where others may see it as charging a higher rate for Deep Tissue, I consider it as offering a discount for Swedish. In summary, ‘I don’t charge MORE for Deep Tissue, I charge LESS for Swedish & other modalities.’ 😉
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I charge $5.00 extra for deep tissue. It’s more straining on my hands and requires more effort which intern I take fewer appointments. I’ve never had a client complain about the increased price either. So for my practice it works.
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I work on a body builder with layers and layers of muscle….that’s justifiable for the rate increase on deep tissue. He’s a regular client, if my body mechanics were off, I would be a mess and I wouldn’t be able to get through those layers of muscle that are “deep” requiring me to work deeper.
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Exactly. I have great body mechanics (although could always use improvement in some areas), but saying a deep tissue is as easy as a swedish is minimizing the work of the therapist, IMO. I actually find it a bit offensive. I find Swedish massage quite easy on the body, but deep tissue takes more work. Especially sports massage on a huge, solid, muscular man. We must all be doing it wrong, then?
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For clients to continue valuing massage at a healthy level, I agree with charging more for deep tissue styles of bodywork. There is greater usage of the therapists’ body and more detailed knowledge of anatomy is needed as well. Swedish massage is primarily meant for relaxation, any therapeutic massage beyond this demands more effort whether for realigning the body or clinically oriented bodywork.
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good body mechanics can not alone compensate for the overall wear and tear on your body, I’m not sure how your neuro clients are but I have very large men, ex NFL and some MMA, plus I customize product usage for the massage style, swedish gets just biotone bought in bulk and some essential oils, neuro gets joint and muscle cream and usually sombra at minimum plus for deep tissue I almost always use aids like hot rocks, bamboo or other to help my get get started, that adds cleaning cost and product wear, my neuros are more in depth plus I utilize additional education and incorporate some gentle tai yoga stretches to further the effect. So I have listed 3 of my main reasons for charging for and 2 of them are not wear and tear on my body, although for me that is #1.
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i don’t charge more for DT, but I do offer a seniors’ discount. I do, however, charge more for Hot Stone massage because it takes 15-30min of my time to clean them afterwards, and I charge more for spa treatments that use product, so that I don’t lose money on the deal.
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In my practice I charge more for deep tissue/clinical work. Swedish massage doesn’t require the brain power that assessment and clinical approach requires, as well as the physical effort if you are moving limbs, checking ROM, doing PNF stretches, and the like. Swedish is generally the first thing taught in massage school as far as hands on work. Myofascial, Trigger Point work and more advanced modalities do cost a lot to learn. If you took classes for prenatal and wanted to charge more for those sessions, that is your right as a practitioner. People will pay you what you are worth! If you have expertise in other modalities, price them how you feel is worth that expertise. Don’t under sell yourself. You know the benefits which you provide!
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I charge for my time and don’t have different charges for different treatments, but that’s just how I like to run my business. If another therapist wants to charge more or less for different treatments that’s their call.
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One of the toughest clients I’ve worked on recently is a challenge. Though I’m well trained in deep tissue body mechanics this client has the toughest fascia I’ve come accross. After doing 2 hours of deep tissue, the nxt day I’m sore but I still don’t break a sweat unlike some of my coworkers lol. If someone wants to charge more for deep tissue that’s their choice so we shouldn’t judge or think of ourselves more highly. We are all different.
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I really like therapeutic body work so feel free to send all those tuff ones to me. its all in the mechanics folks. I will send all my Swedish clients
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I do charge more for both deep tissue and for pregnancy massage as I had to acquire additional specialized training for my prenatal certification as it involved more extensive/ different studying and training of anatomy, trigger points, contraindications, etc. Taking into account the different positioning, consort considerations for the client in the later stages, much like deep tissue there is a different use and exertion of my skills level of work and body mechanics used. Unfortunately many people treat prenatal as just Swedish in a side-lying position and many who perform prenatal in spas are NOT properly trained or certified to do so IMO watching a 30 min home video does not a certification make, And I also agree w/ Jennica, how are we ever going to be expected to be taken seriously if we’re always discounting all over the place – I feel this is one of the primary reasons a lot of people have difficulty seeing our service as a necessity or compliment to their health and wellness and continue to view it as a ‘treat’ or ‘luxury’. It may be hard to admit but there is a certain expectation of quality and competence that comes along with competitive pricing. When your pricing is always cheap or discounted – that’s how your work is viewed as cheap.
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I sometimes wonder if the LMT’s are doing deep tissue or deep pressure when they talk about being worn out after doing it. i find that the deeper tissue that i work on the lighter pressure i’m actually doing (sometimes confusing to my clients which is the perfect chance for me to educate them on the difference). i have had many / most of my clients tell me they’ve never had a massage like i do – i combine many “techniques” — swedish / rom / pnf / trigger point / deep tissue – basically what ever they’re body is telling me it needs. i’ll work on all the “tough” clients that you want to charge extra for and i’ll send you all my “swedish” clients – i almost want to charge extra for that since it stresses me out to do only swedish – if i find a knot or something – i want to work it out to benefit my client!
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In my area I have seen them charge more for prenatal than deep tissue!
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deep tissue is more specialised and carries with it more “risk”, more on costs and more effort (both mental and physical). I charge less for Swedish because it’s simple and easy to do – to me, it’s like meditation. Remedial is a worthy challenge. And those of you who swear “it’s all body mechanics”, get over yourselves and get some experience with professional athletes (esp footballers) before you make your judgements.
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Here’s another thing I wonder about as well….in spa’s well, in most spas – they almost always upcharge for evvvvery little ‘extra’ thing, most of which we use anyway – paraffin, aromatherapy, bio-freeze, wrapping/ taping, etc. Why are those charges NEVER questioned in fact most people are happy to pay the difference w/o giving it a second thought, but as individual practitioners, we are nickeled and dimed to death about why we charge this and why we charge that – I promsie you I believe its a direct effect of the group-on syndrome – why pay full price and actually COMPENSATE the therapist for his/her time/effort/energy/skill, when you can just wait for the next dirt cheap discount!
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I’ve been doing “deep tissue” for 20 years. I charge more because if you need deeper work, my education and experience is worth paying for. Deep work can be anything from deep muscle therapy, fascial work or craniosacral work. When the person’s body is ready for Swedish maintenance work the fee is adjusted to the lower price. I have also worked on my body mechanics constantly over he years so I can continue to give people massage therapy, no matter what type of bodywork they need. I do have to say, when I have somebody on the table who needs pure physical strength to get what they need, I am very happy that I am making more money.
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Seems difficult to charge more for a service if it’s based on the reasoning of extra effort…that would mean we have to charge more for an OBESE client and bulky athletes, and LESS for skinny minny and the cyclists/runners who are thin (but still athletes).

As for training, all clients benefit from training, not just what ever style chosen for the session.

Products? Absolutely charge extra. They cost extra. Aromatherapy oils are expensive!
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The salon I work at charges more for deep tissue than Swedish (the former receptionist set the prices. She was not an MT, but shes had massages in the past making her an expert {I hate people like that}). Most people I see there want relaxing with deep pressure. If they really want deep tissue, I will do it at the regular price of the Swedish (it doesn’t matter to me). In my out call business, I charge different for relaxation and therapeutic. Relaxation is easy to me, and some people just want to relax, which is fine. I charge more for therapeutic because it does take greater knowledge and training. I have never had anyone complain.
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I myself do an integrated style of massage, using many different techniques in a single session. As others have stated , deep tissue is harder- but using leverage, and for Pete’s sake, slowing down makes a world of difference in how much pressure you have to use, how uncomfortable it is for you and the client, and how sore they might be later. There are a lot of good arguments here, and I think all of them are valid. I charge for my time. Deep tissue takes longer, or else it will only be a targeted session, not a full body. So for me, it all equals out. Each therapist has to decide what is ethical and appropriate for them. There just isn’t one right answer to this question. For instance, I do quite a bit of deep tissue, and some of it isn’t about pressure. But, I don’t have any football players or body builders. Everyone’s clientele is different, and you have to look at that….

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I charge exactly the same for all my work. I charge by the time, with different rates for half hour, hour or 90 minute massage. I don’t feel that the patient can know in advance what kind of treatment they will need – we make that decision after I have done the intake and assessment. I treat based on what I find and what their needs and goals are. I do whatever techniques are most suited to helping the patient — I don’t do more or less based on what they are able to pay.
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I charge by time & modality and I have never had a client be upset or argue with me about my rates once I explain that the more specific the massage, the more detail is involved. I charge a higher rate for PreNatal than Deep Tissue or Sports. Everyone’s rates are their own choice. I have chosen to value my services & professional liability accordingly.
Any therapist who is practicing should have liability insurance at the least even if they are in unregulated territory. Having said insurance and/or credentials is an automatic need for CE to maintain these. Some therapists will spend more on CE while others will spend less. If you are one to spend more, then charge more for your sessions across the board. Deep tissue techniques are not hard on the body if you are truly applying proper technique and body mechanics. Please send me the “toughies”….deep tissue rocks!
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i work deep tissue in preventive injury and injury treatment, i work with professional mma fighters, pro lacrosse players and at boeing on the factory workers who build the planes, many of these people dwarf me in size and their strength as athletes which demands a intense amount of work in a short amount of time. i work with people who out weigh me by 150 and up. and the most time i have is a half hour to be effective and 15 at the shortest. it is very different than Swedish even with proper mech. this has been my experience.
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It is just a business and marketing tactic. You can do whatever you want really. You could charge more for pregnancy massage or different rates for any type of massage really. why not?
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Personally I can’t be bothered trying to charge for different services when it comes to massage. I charge for my time and skill. If you want spa services they are charged accordingly.
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I think it is a personal choice on what therapists want to charge. I myself mix my techniques…if I do massage at my house for friends that come over I just charge one price. Also at the Chiropractors we charge one price..I just find that its easier to just stick with one price.. and tell them I do my consult and then from there create my massage based on what I think is best for them..esp. depending on what they do for work. I don’t think you can compare Swedish to deep tissue.Swedish is long flowy strokes and I feel lazy doing them lol and just feel like I’m rubbing in lotion. I do deeper lunges and I feel like cross fiber work does make me sweat. Especially when I do a lot of my forearm and elbow work.. I am def using more of my body and more effort. But sometimes I believe it all falls on the therapist.. I’ve gotten many massages.. and sometime’s I find myself thinking.. that felt lazy.. or wow.. now that he/she has moved on to my right side of my back I can feel the difference on the other side already! Some people just put more effort into their work.. and I believe they deserve to charge a higher rate! 🙂
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I charge a bit more for specialties, such as prenatal, hotstone, lymph drainage, ashiatsu etc – modalities that require special training and/or extra equipment. I charge the same price for THERAPEUTIC massage, be it swedish, deep tissue, trigger point work, or a combination of all. Massage Nerd is correct. We should all know how to give proper pressure to each body using proper mechanics and not feel we need to charge more for clients who may or may not feel what you felt.

  
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imho, if a therapist has invested time and money to learn advanced modalities then it is justified to adjust the fee accordingly.
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Deep tissue requires more work for the MT, physically and thought process as well as training. And yes, it can be taxing despite proper body mechanics. I don’t book as many DT clients in the same day as I would swedish. I think blaming the ability or lack of on just body mechanics is very inaccurate. For the record I charge a flat fee regardless of the tyoe of massage.
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